Index
Practical ecological knowledge for the temperate reader.

Calystegia Sp. - Morning-glory

Family: Convolvulaceae (Dodder) [E-flora]

"Perennial herb, subshrub from caudex or rhizome, glabrous to tomentose. Stem: short to high-climbing, generally twisting, twining. Leaf: generally > 1 cm, linear to reniform or sagittate to hastate (deeply divided). Inflorescence: peduncle generally 1-flowered; bracts generally ± opposite, lobed or not, > 1 mm below calyx, not hiding it, small, to < 1 mm below calyx, hiding it or ± so, large. Flower: generally showy; corolla glabrous, white or yellow to pink or purple; ovary chamber 1, style 1, stigma lobes 2, oblong, tips obtuse. Fruit: ± spheric, ± inflated. Seed: generally ± 4.
± 25 species: temperate, worldwide. (Greek: hiding calyx, by bracts of some) [Brummitt 2002 Madroño 49:130–131] Intermediates common, often difficult to identify. Molecular evidence indicates close relationship with Convolvulus (Carine et al. 2004 Amer J Bot 91:1070–1085). Bracts qualify as bractlets by some definitions. Leaf blade length measured along midrib." [Jepson]

Local Species;

  1. Calystegia soldanella - Beach bindweed [E-flora]
  2. Calystegia sepium - Hedge false bindweed [E-flora]

References


Calystegia soldanella - Beach bindweed

"Calystegia soldanella is a PERENNIAL CLIMBER growing to 0.6 m (2ft).
It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jun to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, lepidoptera.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil." [PFAF]

This is a blue-listed taxon in BC

"General: Perennial from a deep rhizome; stems creeping but not twining, 10-30 cm long." [IFBC-E-flora]

"Habitat / Range Moist to mesic sand dunes in the lowland zone; infrequent along the coast; S to CA, also in the islands of the Pacific Ocean and Europe." [IFBC-E-flora]

Status: Native [E-flora]

Hazards

Edible Uses

Other Uses

Medicinal Uses

"Antiscorbutic, diuretic, febrifuge, irritant, purgative and vermifuge[218]." [PFAF]

Cultivation & Propagation

"Easily grown in ordinary well-drained garden soil in a sunny position[1, 200]. This species is very difficult to establish successfully in the garden[1]." [PFAF]

"Seed - sow spring in a cold frame in a free draining compost and only just cover. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 3 months at 15oc[138]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in early spring whilst dormant[200]." [PFAF]

Synonyms

References


Calystegia sepium ssp. sepium - Hedge false bindweed

Subtaxa Present in B.C.

"Habitat / Range Moist streamsides, river bottoms and shorelines in the lowland, steppe and montane zones; common in SW BC, infrequent on the Queen Charlotte Islands, rare in NE, SC and SE BC; introduced from E North America." [IFBC-E-flora]

Species Mentioned "The species here considered (also called Convolvulus sepium L.) has a wide natural distribution and consists of several races. Its sylvatica subspecies is our ubiquitous, very familiar Morning Glory, with flowers about 4 inches wide. Other kinds (none native) exist both wild and cultivated hereabouts, but none are as strong or large." [Arthurlee]

"Calystegia sepium is a PERENNIAL CLIMBER growing to 3 m (9ft 10in) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, lepidoptera.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil." [PFAF]

Status: Exotic [E-flora]

"General: Perennial herb from an elongate, slender rhizome; stems trailing to climbing, 2-3 m long, glabrous to softly hairy.

Hazards

Edible Uses

Other Uses

Medicinal Uses

Phytochemistry

"The trihydroxy alkaloid, calystegin A3, was a moderately good inhibitor of beta-glucosidase (Ki = 4.3 x 10(-5) M) and a weak inhibitor of alpha-galactosidase (Ki = 1.9 x 10(-4) M). An increased level of hydroxylation, as in the tetrahydroxy calystegins B, consisting of 27% calystegin B1 and 73% calystegin B2, resulted in greatly enhanced inhibitory activity. The calystegins B were potent inhibitors of beta-glucosidase (Ki = 3 x 10(-6) M) and alpha-galactosidase (Ki = 7 x 10(-6) M). These levels of activity are comparable with those of the polyhydroxy indolizidine alkaloids castanospermine and swainsonine toward alpha-glucosidase and alpha-mannosidase, respectively, and of the polyhydroxy pyrrolizidine alkaloid australine toward alpha-glucosidase. The calystegins therefore compose a new structural class of polyhydroxy alkaloids, the nortropanes, possessing potent glycosidase inhibitory properties."[Calystegins]

"Caselpa is a rhizome lectin from Calystegia sepium (Hedge bindweed) that has a dimeric form." [Ipomoelin]

Cultivation & Propagation

"Easily grown in ordinary garden soil in a sunny position, but plants are apt to become invasive[1, 200]. Hedge bindweed is a troublesome garden weed, especially when growing on moist soils[1, 4]. The plant is a vigorous climber with annual shoots 3 metres or more long. These twine around other plants and can kill them by smothering them[4]. Once established, it is very difficult to eradicate the plant because it has very deep roots and is capable of re-growing from any part of the root left in the ground. The flowers open in sunny weather and remain closed during dull weather[4]. Nearly all taxa in Calystegia intergrade geographically into neighboring taxa with the exception of the widespread coastal species, C. soldanella (Linnaeus) R. Brown. It is impossible to draw clearly defined specific limits, and intermediate forms are always found where two taxa approximate geographically[266]." [PFAF]

"Seed - sow spring in a cold frame in a free draining compost and only just cover. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 3 months at 15°c[138]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in early spring whilst dormant[200]." [PFAF]

Synonyms

References

  1. [Arthurlee] Wild Morning-Glory, by Arthur Lee Jacobson, http://www.arthurleej.com/a-morningglory.html, Accessed Jan 16, 2021; Originally published as the Seattle Tilth newsletter Weed of the Month in July 1987, along with an illustration drawn by Jerri Geer.
  2. [Calystegins]Calystegins, a novel class of alkaloid glycosidase inhibitors., R J Molyneux, Y T Pan, A Goldmann, D A Tepfer, A D Elbein, Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 1993-07-01
  3. [E-flora] https://linnet.geog.ubc.ca/Atlas/Atlas.aspx?sciname=Calystegia%20sepium&redblue=Both&lifeform=7, Accessed Jan 15, 2021
  4. [Ipomoelin] Ipomoelin, a Jacalin-Related Lectin with a Compact Tetrameric Association and Versatile Carbohydrate Binding Properties Regulated by Its N Terminus, Wei-Chieh Chang,1 Kai-Lun Liu,1 Fang-Ciao Hsu,3 Shih-Tong Jeng,1,2 and Yi-Sheng Cheng, PLoS One. 2012; 7(7): e40618.
  5. Calystegia sepium, http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calystegia+sepium, Plants For A Future, U.K., Accessed May 30, 2014

Page last modified on Saturday, January 16, 2021 11:35 AM