Index
Practical ecological knowledge for the temperate reader.

Anthemis Sp- Chamomile/Mayweed

Family: Asteraceae (Aster) [E-flora]

"Annual, perennial herb, often aromatic; herbage strigose to long-soft-hairy or ± glabrous. Stem: 1–5+, decumbent to erect, generally branched. Leaf: most cauline, alternate, petioled or sessile, ± obovate to spoon-shaped, 1–3-pinnately divided. Inflorescence: heads radiate [discoid], 1 or in rounded to flat-topped clusters; involucre obconic to hemispheric or wider, phyllaries persistent, generally 21–35+, ± graduated in 3–5 series, free, generally lanceolate, oblong, or elliptic, margin and tip scarious, receptacle hemispheric to narrowly conic, paleate throughout or distally; paleae awl-shaped or elliptic to obovate. Ray flower: (0)5–20+, pistillate or sterile (style present); corolla white [yellow or pink]. Disk flower: generally 100–300+; corolla generally yellow, tube << funnel-shaped throat, swollen, lobes ± triangular; anther tip ± ovate; style tips truncate. Fruit: obovoid to obconic or top-shaped, round or 4-angled, generally 10-ribbed, smooth or tubercled, glabrous; pappus 0 or crown-like.
± 175 species: Europe, western Asia, northern Africa. (Greek: flower) [Watson 2006 FNANM 19:537–538] Cota tinctoria (L.) Guss. [Anthemis tinctoria L. in TJM (1993)] occasional escape from cultivation.
Unabridged note: Cota tinctoria (L.) J. Gay ex Guss. (Anthemis tinctoria L. in TJM (1993)) occasional escape from cultivation." [Jepson]

Identification

1. Rays yellow................Anthemis tinctoria

1. Rays white.

2. Receptacles papery throughout, achenes with smooth ribs..................Anthemis arvensis

2. Receptacles papery only above the middle; achenes with glandular-tuberculate (bumpy) ribs..................Anthemis cotula [E-flora]

Local Species;

  1. Anthemis arvensis - Corn Chamomile [E-flora]
  2. Anthemis cotula - Mayweed [E-flora]
  3. Anthemis tinctoria - Yellow Chamomile [E-flora]

References


Anthemis arvensis - Corn Chamomile

"Anthemis arvensis is a ANNUAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in) by 0.3 m (1ft).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from June to July, and the seeds ripen from July to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Flies, beetles. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
" [PFAF]

General: "Annual, aromatic herb from a taproot; stems erect, leafy, simple or branched, hairy, 10-60 cm tall." [IFBC-E-flora]

Habitat / Range: "Dry roadsides and disturbed areas in the lowland and montane zones; frequent in extreme SW BC, rare in SE BC; introduced from Europe." [IFBC-E-flora]

Status: Exotic [E-flora]

Medicinal Uses

Cultivation

"Prefers a sunny position and a well-drained soil that is neutral to slightly acid[1, 200]. Succeeds in heavy clay soils." [PFAF]

References


Anthemis cotula - Mayweed

"Anthemis cotula is a ANNUAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from July to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Flies, beetles. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
" [PFAF]

General: "Annual, ill-scented herb from a taproot; stems erect, leafy, simple or branched, essentially glabrous, 10-60 cm tall." [IFBC-E-flora]

Habitat / Range "Dry roadsides and disturbed sites in the lowland and montane zones; common in S BC, less frequent N of 54degreeN; introduced from Europe." [IFBC-E-flora]

Status: Exotic [E-flora]

Hazards

"The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching it or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.[4,222PFAF] This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers[254]." [PFAF]

Edible Uses

Other Uses

Medicinal Uses

"Mayweed is closely related to camomile, but is far less effective as a medicine[254]. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus[254]. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine[254]." [PFAF]

Whole Plant

"The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic[4, 61]. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used[4]. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers[257]. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water[4, 257]." [PFAF]

Leaves

"The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings[222]. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters[240]." [PFAF]

Cultivation

"Prefers a sunny position and a well-drained soil that is neutral to slightly acid[1, 200]. Succeeds in heavy clay soils. Bees dislike this plant[4]. The leaves contain glands which release a most disagreeable odour when the plant is handled and can cause allergic reactions in people." [PFAF]

References


Anthemis tinctoria - Yellow Chamomile

"Anthemis tinctoria is an evergreen Perennial growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.8 m (2ft 7in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 6 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies), flies, beetles. The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.
" [PFAF]

General: "Short-lived perennial, unscented herb with fibrous roots; stems erect, leafy, simple or branched, hairy, at least above, 30-70 cm tall." [IFBC-E-flora]

Habitat / Range "Dry roadsides and disturbed areas in the lowland, steppe and montanes zones; infrequent in S BC, rare in WC BC; introduced from Eurasia." [IFBC-E-flora]

Status: Exotic [E-flora]

Other Uses

Medicinal Uses

Synonyms

Cota tinctoria. [E-flora]

References


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